Recognizing Decision-Making Approach

Decision-Making Approach reflects a choice between taking immediate action to get something done or researching options to find the best, long-term solution. While this factor is context-sensitive, meaning it can show up differently in various parts of our life, we are usually either naturally Convergent (meaning focused or prioritized toward immediate action) or Divergent (meaning unfocused and open to exploring all options until the best becomes obvious). Some individuals can be both, called a Variable Approach, which allows them greater versatility. For some, this compatibility factor is difficult to identify because of contradictory beliefs set in place by parental imprinting. We discover our natural Decision-Making Approach by seeing how our decisions generate either positive energy or seem like work. The more effective we are at identifying someone’s Decision-Making Approach, the more supportive we can be in facilitating mutual decisions.

$59.00

How To See Decision-Making Approach

Decision-Making Approach reflects a choice between taking immediate action to get something done or researching options to find the best, long-term solution. While this factor is context-sensitive, meaning it can show up differently in various parts of our life, we are usually either naturally Convergent (meaning focused or prioritized toward immediate action) or Divergent (meaning unfocused and open to exploring all options until the best becomes obvious). Some individuals can be both, called a Variable Approach, which allows them greater versatility. For some, this compatibility factor is difficult to identify because of contradictory beliefs set in place by parental imprinting. We discover our natural Decision-Making Approach by seeing how our decisions generate either positive energy or seem like work. The more effective we are at identifying someone’s Decision-Making Approach, the more supportive we can be in facilitating mutual decisions.

Decision-Making Approach provides a framework for engaging others in common work. Without clarity about our approach, mutual work becomes impossible. Convergent Decision-Making eliminates and prioritizes options in a limited timeframe to promote a sense of progress. Divergent Decision-Makers create satisfaction by coming up with new ideas and testing everything possible to find the best one. Convergent Decision-Making maximizes results within a timeframe; Divergent Decision-Making maximizes results based on a spatial framework of inter-related ideas. They prefer to wait until the energy is right, then do everything at once. The more we understand Convergent and Divergent approaches, the greater our capacity to separate ourselves from personal preferences and accomplish what is needed based on the best approach, given the current problem.

Convergent Decision-Makers reduce the scope of a project so that they can take action quickly. This is an incremental approach that allows Convergent individuals to feel they are always making progress. Our natural focus is to scope out what can be done now, so we can implement cleanly and build on incremental results. Since our focus is to quickly eliminate options that do not fit our criteria, we tend to distrust external input that seems to have no immediate apparent contribution. We measure our performance by how quickly we can produce results rather than whether or not the results are the best. We test others as to their effectiveness in supporting our Decision-Making Approach by giving them tasks where we measure the effectiveness of their response. This means we want to eliminate the unpredictability of extraneous people in the process. We appreciate it when others help us reduce options because we seek to get to the bottom line quickly. If we are not yet ready to make a decision, we want to know how quickly we can have everything set up when we are ready. (so it takes just one call to make it all work). This is because time is important to us and we will hold others accountable to the time frames they give us.

Divergent Decision-Makers explore all options, waiting until they know they have found the best choice. For them, something needs to change to know everything is ready to move forward. This is an all-or-nothing approach that allows Divergent individuals to organize their energy and effort around a worthy choice. We are seeking the ultimate best decision because we do not want to deal with short-term incremental approaches that minimize the big picture. We measure our effectiveness by how completely we define what we need, so we do not have to revisit the situation. Naturally we love Decision-Making Approaches that have an open timeframe. It is difficult to imagine that others will understand our criteria for the decision and be able to respond to us in a supportive way. This does not keep us from asking our friends, business associates or partners for their input or ideas to make sure we are not missing something in the Decision-Making Approach. This keeps us from making the choice blindly based on the word of someone with no stake in the outcome. We would rather make no decision than the wrong one. To take action, everything has to line up. We love researching choices, which makes us seem like procrastinators to Convergent Decision-Makers. This class is a bit longer, not just because we look at many pictures, but we spend extra time sorting out parental imprinting. We also talk about the new supplemental Decision-Making effectiveness factor.


Facilitators: Larry Byram & Sandra Jaquith
Prerequisites: Creative Uniqueness (recommended)
Class Schedule: Saturday, October 6th, 2018
Location: 2945 Center Green Court, Ste. E, Boulder, CO 80301
Class Times: 1 to 5pm MST