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Recognizing Pacing

Pacing reflects how well we are able to synchronize the ways we assimilate information and experiences so we experience a heart connection. Everyone processes their experience at different speeds and chunk sizes. Fast-paced individuals assimilate smaller chunks quickly and become frustrated when others drop out of the picture. Slow-paced individuals assimilate larger chunks slowly and become exhausted when they can no longer keep up. In a way, slow-paced people think more broadly in horizontal terms, while fast-paced people think more narrowly in vertical terms. Pacing is not related to intelligence, even though culturally we have been taught that it is. In general, we tend to believe that quick-witted, fast-talking people must be smarter than slow-paced people.

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How To See Pacing In Others

Pacing reflects how well we are able to synchronize the ways we assimilate information and experiences so we experience a heart connection. Everyone processes their experience at different speeds and chunk sizes. Fast-paced individuals assimilate smaller chunks quickly and become frustrated when others drop out of the picture. Slow-paced individuals assimilate larger chunks slowly and become exhausted when they can no longer keep up. In a way, slow-paced people think more broadly in horizontal terms, while fast-paced people think more narrowly in vertical terms. Pacing is not related to intelligence, even though culturally we have been taught that it is. In general, we tend to believe that quick-witted, fast-talking people must be smarter than slow-paced people. Obviously, a counter-example is Albert Einstein, who was an extremely slow-paced person, even though his imprinting from his mother was faster.

When we have similar Pacing, we can learn and grow together more easily. Common pacing lets us maintain a heart connection indefinitely. Pairs of people who have large differences in pacing have more trouble getting into alignment and staying in sync with their partners. With different Pacing, we have to take more breaks so we can regenerate our energy. If we are not honoring our true pacing (by falling into parental imprint patterns), we need large breaks from the relationships we are in, and need to maintain greater psychic distance in order to survive. The key is that, with every Compatibility difference, there are solutions that can be used to counteract this disconnection. In the case of a large pacing difference, we need to learn how to take small breaks from each other so we can energetically regenerate, which creates greater harmony. Another suggestion, among many others found in this work, is that romantic partners with large pacing differences may need to occasionally sleep apart, because when they sleep together, they create an energetic engagement that prevents them from fully regenerating.

The best way to observe a person’s pace is to calibrate their natural pacing to your natural pacing. We do this by identifying the speed at which we naturally assimilate new experiences where we have the most say or control in the outcome. This is called our home base pacing. This is where we feel the most creative, open and able to engage new experiences in a self-generating and sustainable way. We want to be in touch with that place at all times so we are clear when and to what degree we are using our energy when not operating in our natural rhythm. Referring to our home base and comparing it with where others creatively resonate with their pacing allows us to see the gap and plan our best means of connecting with them. The more we calibrate the differences in pacing with people, the more capable we become in recognizing the effect that the difference has on us, which empowers us to manage our personal resources more effectively.

Individuals can recognize they are not in their home base if they need to rejuvenate, refresh and recover after being with someone. When we use our home base effectively, we maintain our center of balance and are able to navigate through the day without getting jammed by other people with different pacing. While the first major indication of differences is the feeling of frustration or impatience (faster paced) or the feeling of being drained or overwhelmed (slower paced), it is easy to overestimate the degree to which the differences are experienced. For example, a fast paced person may seem extremely fast, a slow paced person may seem extremely slow. In this class, besides looking at pictures of people with diverse Pacing rates, we will also identify a Pacing effectiveness factor that tells us our effective coverage of the population.


Facilitators: Larry Byram & Sandra Jaquith
Prerequisites: Creative Uniqueness (recommended)
Class Schedule: Thursday, September 20th, 2018
Location: 2945 Center Green Court, Ste. E, Boulder, CO 80301
Class Times: 6 to 9pm MST